Amazing Iceland

If you have a passion for travel, like me, you’ll have a long list of places yearning to be sampled. But there is always one lingering there in the background that feels kind of special and for me that was Iceland. Over the past few years I’ve pored over endless articles on the amazing abundance … Read More →

A Fleeting Trip to Icelandic Waters by Lorelai MacLeod

I’m still indulging the holiday spirit and today I’m delighted to say that we are treated to another post from the talented, Lorelai MacLeod, who this time shares her recent Icelandic jaunt with us. Over to you, Lorelai:

Thank you so much Jane for inviting me back to your lovely blog. I do hope you like the photos.

I mentioned Icelandic waters rather than Iceland, not because we travelled by boat, though we did, but because water seems to be the main place I aim the camera – that and at my husband imitating statues.

Talking of which; Reykjavik’s striking Hallgrímskirkja church, of which many pictures can be found online (I do have one, but it’s far too daft), is visible from much of the city. This is my husband outside said Lutheran establishment, trying his best to embody the spirit of Norse explorer Leifur Eiriksson.

 

Travelling in June, the sun never set, so the rugged landscape could be admired all hours of the day. Iceland in summer is gorgeously green and an abundance of wild grasses and herbs make Icelandic lamb some of the best in the world.

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A Few of my Favourite Frenchies

It’s a short post from me this week as I’m just back from our family holiday in the sleepy Dordogne. Once again we were treated to long evenings of rich wine and engaging conversation with our friends at ‘Josse’, and surrounded by panoramic views of vineyards and fields of sunflowers. All in all, a very relaxing week. Here’s a few of my highlights:

Rocamadour

Rocamadour is built into the sheer rock face of a gorge above the River Dordogne. Built on the shrine of a Madonna, it’s thought that the Abbey here dates back almost a thousand years in some form and, believed to hold great healing powers, became the site of a major pilgrimage over the ages.

 

The village beneath the Abbey is full of paved streets, lined with medieval houses and contains fortified stone gateways, all of which are totally breathtaking.

We did take the 216 steps down (although not on our knees as the pilgrims once did), but there is also a winding road that leads down and I believe a lift for the less discerning traveller. Certainly worth a look if you are in the area.

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Taking Time Out in the Scottish Highlands

The Lonely Planet calls The Trossachs, ‘achingly beautiful’. Less than an hour’s drive north of the hustle and bustle of Glasgow, The Trossachs (also known as the gateway to the Highlands) couldn’t be more different to Scotland’s second city. It’s a mountainous National Park, with lochs around just about every corner, plenty of wildlife and lush, rolling countryside in abundance.

This is a place of peace and tranquillity, where internet connection and mobile phone signals are practically non-existent, where cars slow to allow ducks to cross the road, red squirrels climb the trees and the only sounds you wake to in the mornings are the gush of a nearby waterfall, the trill of birds singing and the wind whispering through the forest.

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